John Wilson

John Wilson gets away from it all in the Gambia- where the fishing’s as hot as weather.
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Wilsons Angle

I guess that while readers might expect my first article for the NJ to extol the virtues of the fabulous pike and chub fishing to be had in the country right now, allow me to give you a different angle. Truth is, when temperatures drop below zero and there is snow on the ground, or thick ice makes fishing on the Boards impossible, I love to get away from it all and take advantage of the fact that many tour companies offer attractive alternative leisure in the Tropics at most affordable prices.
Lets take The Gambia in West Africa, for example. Just a six hour flight away, you can laze by the pool or sit on a beach sipping cool pena coladas, visit wildlife parks, or haggle over the price of wood carvings in the markets. And the fishing? Well, the Gambia is a tropical haven with average temperature in the 90s, and is blessed with the fertile waters of a huge river system several hundred miles long.
In addition to spewing it’s waters into the Atlantic Ocean, where you can troll the pelagic species or anchor up and do battle with everything from sharks downwards, the river’s shoreline contains an enormous maze of mangrove channels. For the cost of hiring a dinghy all sorts of oddities fall to those who anchor and present cut fish strip or shrimp on the bottom. Stingrays and snappers, bastard halibut and barracuda to name a few require nothing more than the same outfit you would use in British waters for carp and pike with a reel line of 10-15lbs. A 2oz bomb and hooks sizes 6-2/0.
Frankly, these mangrove creeks are worth exploring for the exotic bird life alone. Pelicans, osprey, goliath herons, plus countless waders, are daily sightings among the oyster-encrusted mangrove roots which become exposed at low tide, when the fascinating fiddler crabs are most active away from their holes.
Beach fishing is particularly rewarding if you start as the sun drops, which is when the big boys move close inshore to feed. Small sharks and stingrays to over 100lbs, catfish and guitarfish to 50lbs plus are regular customers to bait of small whole mullet cast 50-80 yards from the shore. It is wise to use a wire trace with hooks in the 4/0-6/0 range and a reel line of 20-25lbs. Otherwise it is the same outfit you would use for cod fishing off our East Coast. But always leave the reel out of gear with the ratchet on or the rod could go for a swim.
On my last visit, just a few weeks back, I teamed up with an old pal, Mark Longster, who runs Warrior Sports Fishing and offers off-shore charters from Denton Road Bridge, adjacent to the old peanut factory. Regular viewers of my Go Fishing television series will no doubt remember the 300lb lemon shark Mark and I caught in the mouth of the Gambia river just a few miles out from Banjul, Gambia’s capital.
On this last trip, we concentrated on trolling the winding mangrove creeks for barracuda, and bottom fishing over the numerous rocky reefs and sand bars close inshore for big red snappers, kujeli and ladyfish using 20 and 30lb class outfits. Bait was whole belly fillets of bonga (a herring-like local fish) for the snappers. These beautifully coloured, fully scaled battlers we took to around 25lbs along with a host of other oddities-fish so weird and wonderful in both colours and shape the mind immediately questions the particular purpose for which nature created them.
A step down to really light tackle and change of bait to shrimp literally means a bite a chuck from exquisitely shaped angel fish-which would set you back £50 at your local marine aquatic centre-to the prickly puffer fish which inflates to three times its size as a defence mechanism.
As anything and everything may and often does turn up in these waters, we always had a heavy outfit presenting a big bait on the bottom well down-tide of the boat in case a big shark or stingray happened along. Unfortunately, I lost what appeared to be a fair sized shark, the hook inexplicably pulling free after five minutes. But shortly afterwards, a freshly mounted whole Spanish mackerel bait weighing fully 4lbs was snapped up by a bonus 5ft long barracuda weighing over 30lbs. And didn’t it go in an 8-knot tide!

pro johnwilson

Hitting The Big Game

Readers may recall that several weeks ago I suggested a trip to the warmth of The Gambia to escape our winter climate and inconsistent fishing.
Well, I actually decided to take my own advice after my wife Jo hinted that she could do with a week in the Tropics.
It was great to meet up with skipper Mark Longster and Tracey Day, who picked us up from Banjul airport with the news that some jumbo-sized tarpon had been spotted in the mouth of the Gambia River.
We therefore decided as I enjoyed shark and heavy reef fishing on past occassions, to go for all or nothing and the outside chance hooking into a really big tarpon.
Now I must point out that Gambia has no ordinary river estuary.
It varies between 40 feet deep and close on 100 feet deep and is more than four miles wide at a spot called Dog Island, where the tarpon were showing in the late afternoon.
In fact, it looked no different from the Atlantic four miles off Banjul and so, due to strong winds for the first couple of days, we were restricted to trolling for barracudas in the mangrove creeks and bottom-fishing the inner reefs.
When the wind calmed down, we boarded Mark’s 28ft Bayliner, having collected a good supply of live mullet and shad, and headed straight out to Dog Island in the early afternoon, anchoring where only a week before tarpon to 190lb had been landed from the lip of a 50ft gully that shelved down to 70ft within a 100 yards of our stern.
We put four 40-50-lb class rods out, fishing heavy leads on each with mullet or a shad presented just above the bottom with the aid of small cork balls, and sat back to wait for the screeching run of a tarpon.
After two hours, with not the slightest interest shown in out baits, Mark swapped one of the fish rigs over for what he called rack of shrimps averaging six or seven huge shrimps averaging six inches firmly threaded up the line concealing a size 6/0 hook. And within literally two minutes, they were grabbed, not a tarpon unfortunately, but a hard head catfish of around 40lb. That was it for that afternoon.
Within minutes of anchoring in the same spot the following afternoon, huge tarpon could be seen wallowing and crashing through the glass-like surface. They were all huge, between 100lb and 300lb- plus. And, as tarpon to 385lb have been taken in Gambian waters during recent years, some of these monsters could have surpassed even the 400lb mark.
I have never experienced such a spectacle of big fish before. Two hours later, tarpon were still all around the boat. So, to try to calm our nerves, we put a couple of 20lb outfits out, bait with shrimp, in the hope of breaking our duck with a few catfish. And it’s not difficult to guess what soon followed. Yes, Mark’s shrimp was swallowed by a huge tarpon which, after a few thump, to try to calm our nerves, we put a couple of 20lb outfits out, bait with shrimp, in the hope of breaking our duck with a few catfish. And it’s not difficult to guess what soon followed. Yes, Mark’s shrimp was swallowed by a huge tarpon which, after a few thumps under the boat when I’m sure it didn’t know it was hooked, suddenly decided to veer away, ripping off more than 100 yards of line before it twice leapt high into the air, an unbelievable slight.
It was a monstrous fish, looking all of 200lb-plus, and we all cheered as it dived still connected to Mark’s 20lb line. Close on 45 minutes later, having gone completely round the boat, the great fish was tiring and on the end of a short, but extremely frayed 20lb test line. Then the inevitable happened and our euphoria instantly ended with a loud crack!
Did we swear?
Is there the possibility of a world record tarpon being caught in The Gambia?
It’s inevitable!

pro johnwilson

Gamble on the Gambia

It’s usually around this time of the year with the winter weather at the worst, that I am asked where an angler should visit with his family to enjoy both the warmth and the thrill of tropical saltwater fishing.
And because its average temperature is in the 90s and the package holidays are relatively cheap, I’ve no hesitation in recommending Gambia in West Africa where I have enjoyed some fabulous fishing over the years.
I made two of my GO Fishing TV programmes there when, during editing, the problem became not what to put in but what to leave out. The fishing was that prolific, with Yorkshireman Mark Longster my skipper and local guide.
Regular viewers of my shows will recall that we took lemon sharks weighing up to 300lb from a deep watermark at anchor, plus some large barracuda, catfish and even lost a huge stingray. Other interesting species encountered were the cassava, a bass-like fish which grows to over 100lb, and the strange kujeli, or captain fish, which has a transparent snout.
On subsequent trips I’ve also enjoyed some deep-water reef fishing which produced hard-battling jacks and cubera snapper of over 30lb. These Colourful fighters are equipped with immensely strong jaws laden with dog-like teeth, and unless you haul hard and quickly during the early stages of the fight, they will all too easily swim free.
What makes this particular West African location so unbelievably prolific in a galaxy of tropical sportfish sites is the wide and powerful Gambia River which spews into the Atlantic Ocean at Banjul, the capital, where most of the beach-front hotels sit.
The mouth of the river at this point is four miles across and it stretches upstream for 420 miles, where giant catfish and tiger fish live in a fresh water environment.
But it is the central river itself in the heavily coloured tidal reaches around Banjul which, through a mass of channels and sandbars plus interesting island features bordered on both sides by creeks and mangroves, offers truly spectular bran tub fishing.
Here, while creek fishing from bank or boat, you can catch red snappers, barracuda, angel fish, bastard halibut, small sharks and stingrays, plus a whole host of Colourful oddities. The best bait is fresh shrimp or fish strip.
Alternatively, you can fish the swirling waters of a deep tidal channel beneath the Denton road bridge where you are liable to connect with anything from barracudas to stingrays. Small, live shad for bait are easily taken on feathers beneath the bridge.
Beach fishing can be rewarding if you start as the sun starts to drop, which is when the big boys move close inshore to feed-species like small sharks, stingrays, that strange mixture of half-ray and half-shark.
These can top 100lb and, apart from a 2ft wire trace and size 6/0 hook baited with fresh mullet, squid or large shrimp, there is little need to go beyond that of a 12ft British beachcaster for any of the previously mentioned species. A reel line of around 25lb should cope.
RAVELLING south from Banjul there are several sandy beaches offering much larger fish than in the United Kingdom.
But perhaps the most exciting species to be caught in the Gambia is the high-jumping tarpon. These enigmatic nomads are around not only in catchable numbers, but in world record proportions. Tarpons to 380lb have been caught but not officially ratified by the International Game Fishing Association.
But there is nothing to stop visitors enjoying the tarpon’s much smaller cousin, the ladyfish, which readily accepts artificial lures.

pro johnwilson

Mark’s Nearly Tarpon

The Gambia offers fishing for everyone, says Televisions’ ‘Go Fishing’ Star John Wilson
Fully eight feet long and looking the heavier side of 200lb, the massive, silver tarpon catapulted itself high into the air in a cascade of shimmering spray at the end of a blistering run which evaporated a 100 yards of line from his reel. It was trying to rid itself of Mark Longster’s size 2/0 shrimp hook.
It made all those I’d caught in the Florida Keys to over 100lb look positively small. Why use such a small hook for giant tarpon, whose expandable jaw hinges open the mouth to virtually its own diameter? Well it certainly wasn’t intentional.
It just happened that one of hundreds upon hundreds of jumbo-sized tarpon rolling and cavorting all around our anchored boat, which were totally ignoring our float fished and bottom presented live mullet and shads on proper 50lb class gear, sucked in a shrimp on Mark’s 20lb class outfit.
Such events are far from uncommon in the fertile waters of The Gambia where Mark and his partner Tracey Day offer a variety of sport fishing challenges to visiting anglers from their lodge at Denton Bridge, not too far away from the Capital of Banjul.
In the Gambian river system, which includes a fascinating network of mangrove swamps, creeks, inlets and tidal channels in addition to countless deep water marks and reefs offshore plus mile upon mile of deserted, surf stacked beaches, you can expect to catch almost anything that swims in saltwater from weird and wonderful coloured reef dwellers to huge rays, shark and of course, tarpon.
But not just ordinary tarpon. These Gambian fish are monsters even by IGFA standards. The largest landed so far weighed a staggering 385lb, but was not ratified as a world record. That a new tarpon world record will be set in The Gambia is not only inevitable, but long overdue. I have seen the proof with my own eyes.
For something like three hours I watched dumb-founded as literally hundreds of 150lb plus tarpon crashed and wallowed all around Marks boat. From our position off Dog Island, where The Gambian river is over four miles wide and looks more like the North Sea, except for tropical vegetation along the banks, tarpon were crashing and top and tailing across the glass-like surface and stretched for at least a couple of hundred yards in all four direction around the boat.
Until Mark’s shrimp on the wrong gear was grabbed, could we get a run? Could we hell. Although that is not strictly true because one of the live mullet had been nobbled by a 40lb hard-head catfish. Which is why we stuck with live baits on all the 50lb class outfits and this returns me to Marks back-breaking fight with a monstrous tarpon hooked on inadequate tackle and that tiny shrimp hook.
There was no time to lose as Mark’s fish was steadily getting further away from our anchored boat. Fortunately the tide was almost slack now and I buoyed the anchor enabling us to drift with the tarpon for however long it was going to take. Yet still all around the boat were huge tarpon showing their immensely thick flanks covered in scales the size of a beer mat, sometimes mere yards away. Following a spirited battle, Marks fish was after three quarters of an hour – going slowly round and round the boat with Mark in tow. It really looked as though the impossible was actually going to happen and that Mark would be rewarded for skillfully and patiently playing such a monstrous fish on light gear.
The water was by now completely slack and we were both thinking about all sort of line class world records as the tarpon seemed to be getting larger, the closer it came to the boat. Then the inevitable happened with the sudden sound of the line parting like a pistol shot. The 20lb mono was so heavily frayed and distorted for several feet it was amazing the fight lasted as long as it did. That was the last occasion we saw those tarpon that week.

LOADS OF CHOICE

While it’s true to say that until more research about the tarpon’s whereabouts, it is very much a hit and miss affair.
There is such a choice of fishing in The Gambia. I did enjoy some marvelous reef fishing at anchor for barracuda and cubera Snapper. I lost what Mark thought was a real hefty threadfin salmon (Kujeli’s local name) while trolling a Rapala CD18 Magnum plug through the mangrove creeks. But there is never enough time is there?
I could have trolled or fished cut bait at anchor around the edges of the many sandbars for the tarpon’s slimmer, much smaller cousin, the ladyfish which is called nine bones locally.
Then again a day sat in a dinghy at anchor in the creeks would have provided continual action in the way of red snappers, cassava, ray, barracuda and small jack. Alternatively, I could of packed my 12ft beachcaster and gone south of Cape Point to explore a wonderful series of rocky coves and wide sandy beaches where on top of the tide numerous species of shark, plus stingray and huge guitar fish provide unbelievable action on a standard beachcaster, multiplier and 25lb line combo. Mark has recently started beach-fishing safaris using a pair of four-wheel drive custom built Mercedes trucks, transporting guests along the Gambia’s southern coastline to many unspoiled locations.
All the fishing gear is supplied. I’m going to try that one on my next visit!

pro johnwilson

Missile Barracuda

Coloured water hid the entanglement of rocks 60ft below and with the tide now ebbing strongly, we expected something lean and hungry to sniff out and come crashing into our baits. We weren’t to be disappointed! Out of the blue, something unseen made off with a 4lb Spanish mackerel concealing a double 10/0 hook rig. The reel started to squeal like a stuck pig with that uncanny suddenness only associated with shark fishing and when I slammed home the clutch to strike I was certainly not expecting a missile- minded barracuda.
This metallic projectile veered across the tide going like a bat out of hell and performed multiple Polaris impersonations despite the heavy shark trace and 50lb outfit which should have slowed it down, but appeared to have little effect.
Moreover, the cuda had completely swallowed the Spanish mackerel. But then it was close to five feet long and better than 30lb. Not a huge specimen by any means but nice, and typical of the quality in surprises you can expect when probing the deep coloured and incredibly fertile water of the Gambia River.
Yes, I was back in Africa again, guest of an old pal, skipper Mark Longster, who I had seen for nearly four years and whose unexpected fax simply said: ”John, the bottom fishing right now is fantastic. Do you fancy a week’s action?”
Well, who would need asking more than once, I certainly didn’t and was straight on the phone to Thompson Tour Operations to arrange an inexpensive package B&B flight for the middle of November.
Regular viewers of my TV series GO Fishing may recall that Mark and I teamed up four years back when a big lemon shark came along bang on cue for cameras, providing some of the most exciting footage we’ve ever shown on television.
The programme also included assortment of weird and coloured critters you would expect to catch from the mangrove creeks. But on a personal level, and due to lack of time plus the pressure of putting the sequences together, I felt I had rather missed out on the unbelievable choice of onshore boat fishing over reefs and sandbars that the Gambia River has offer… hence my keenness to return.
There are, in fact, over 30, yes30, different species within that meaty, arm wrenching 30lb-50lb weight bracket that you could possibly bump into, and half of these actually top three figures.
In addition to at least seven species of sharks there are several types of ray and guitarfish. Several species of the ‘Jack’ family, African pompano, leer fish, Cobia, Dorado, several different types of snappers, kujeli, cassava, mackerel, tuna,tarpon… have I whetted your appetite.
Mark had specialised more and more on the range of inshore reef fishing options since my last visit, obtaining yet another boat with a particularly low set cuddy, enabling him to pass easily beneath famous Denton Bridge, by the now defunct peanut factory, and straight out from the moorings into the Atlantic, literally within a few minutes motoring distance of numerous productive reefs and sand bars.
Those who have already fished there will know full well that large craft can only get out through the river month and into the Atlantic by navigating a complex network of mangrove creeks which eventually lead to behind the harbour and around the coastline. All of which eats away at precious fishing time.
So mark’s investment in BlackWarrior, a beamy 8 foot wide 22-footer pushed speedily along by a 75hp Suzuki, has more than paid off, resulting in continuous bookings seven days a week.
There is, of course, nothing to stop you hiring a rowing dingy to fish pieces of shrimp in mangrove creeks, or even as some do, though it is exceedingly muddy, walk along the mangroves and bank fish. Standard carp – pike gear with a 10lb – 15lb line will handle most likely customers, though you may have to go for the occasional long row or walk with a stingray.
You can stay anchored out in deep water right in the mouth of the river which is some four miles wide, or motor inland where it is twice the width and fish the strong tide flow close to Dog island and stick it out with big baits on the bottom for sharks.
You can troll Rapala Magnums around inshore reefs and eventually find blue water and consequently add still more species to the list of those expected. Though for this you need a large, fast boat and to motor at least 20-30 miles to evade the colour spewed into the Atlantic by the Gambia River, which is some miles in length with a tidal influence of over half that distance.
My plan was to simply enjoy sport with various battlers around the inshore reefs and sandbars. A trip to the local market close by Sunwing Hotel quickly gave an excellent indication of what the local ‘perog’ fishermen who anchor over the inshore reefs were taking on their hand lines. Big Jacks, Kujeli, snappers and even Cobia were all for sale.
I was surprised about seeing Cobia, called black salmon locally, because I assumed they were really a blue water game species. But specimens approaching 100lb were there for the taking. Unfortunately, a biggy never came my way although I did hook into one which characteristically rose up from the bottom, as opposed to most species which attempt to hang your line around the nearest rock, but slipped the hook after all too short a fight.
Those dogged, hard fighting red snappers however didn’t get away. Known locally as Cubera, the most common of the big snappers were successfully lured on whole belly fillets from a bonga. And it’s interesting to note that these locally netted plankton eaters, the most common fish seen in the markets, is to all intents and purposes related to our allis shad.
Now a 30lb outfit to catch 30lb snapper may perhaps seems slightly over the top but these unbelievable strong warm water reef dwellers quickly shred lighter lines through the rocks of anyone feeling more sporting. It’s hit hold arm wrenching stuff at the very best.
Holding the rod with the reel out of gear and clutch pre-set quite firmly usually sees many more slamming takes converted into snappers in the ice box, due to the uncanny wariness of this fully scaled, one might even say carp-like fish. But there the resemblance certainly ends because the cuberra’s teeth are strong dog-like cannies and its fighting capabilities like all saltwater tropical put carp to shame.
Talking of fighting, one fish I hoped to get amongst during this Gambia break was the mighty tarpon. Mark had taken them in the river mouth to 190lb a few weeks previously but the surface was far too ruffled during my stay for visually locating their characteristic rolling on the surface in large groups.
What we did latch on to however, was the tarpon’s younger cousin, the ladyfish, and what a splendid, acrobatic fish it is . Locally these silver streaks looking for the entire world like a stretched out herring are called ‘nine bones’ and we boated them up to 10lb on lures.
A Rapala ‘slither’ in lime green really did the business when trolled through shallow water no more than six feet deep between huge banks of sand which have built up around the outside entrance to Denton Bridge. Anchoring in these long rolling waves also accounted for them.
We simply made long casts to the side presenting small mullet or herring livebaits on size 2/0 hooks tied direct to 12lb line, with an ounce bomb attached via a link fixed two feet up the line using a four turn water knot, and used the waves to gently bump the bait across the tide.
An exciting technique which also took those rather prehistoric looking flat fish called bastard halibut, which also took Rapalas, and some jumbo sized Kujeli. These strange fish with a built-in jelly-like transparent nose are actually threadfin salmon and while those we took went to 20lb Mark has seen them topping 150lb!
What a place! I can’t wait to get back to the Gambia and keep finding myself hovering around the fax machine just in case I get another invitation.

pro johnwilson

Will he or won’t he?

Fully eight feet long and looking the heavier side of 200lb, the massive, silver tarpon catapulted itself high into the air in a cascade of shimmering spray at the end of a blistering run which evaporated a 100 yards of line from his reel. It was trying to rid itself of Mark Longster’s size 2/0 shrimp hook.
It made all those I’d caught in the Florida Keys to over 100lb look positively small. Why use such a small hook for giant tarpon, whose expandable jaw hinges open the mouth to virtually its own diameter? Well it certainly wasnt intentional.
It just happened that one of hundreds upon hundreds of jumbo-sized tarpon rolling and cavorting all around our anchored boat, which were totally ignoring our float fished and bottom presented live mullet and shads on proper 50lb class gear, sucked in a shrimp on Mark’s 20lb class outfit.
Such events are far from uncommon in the fertile waters of The Gambia where Mark and his partner Tracey Day offer a variety of sport fishing challenges to visiting anglers from their lodge at Denton Bridge, not too far away from the Capital of Banjul.
In the Gambian river system, which includes a fascinating network of mangrove swamps, creeks, inlets and tidal channels in addition to countless deep water marks and reefs offshore plus mile upon mile of deserted, surf stacked beaches, you can expect to catch almost anything that swims in saltwater from weird and wonderful coloured reef dwellers to huge rays, shark and of course, tarpon.
But not just ordinary tarpon. These Gambian fish are monsters even by IGFA standards. The largest landed so far weighed a staggering 385lb, but was not ratified as a world record. That a new tarpon world record will be set in The Gambia is not only inevitable, but long overdue. I have seen the proof with my own eyes.
For something like three hours I watched dumb-founded as literally hundreds of 150lb plus tarpon crashed and wallowed all around Marks boat. From our position off Dog Island, where The Gambian river is over four miles wide and looks more like the North Sea, except for tropical vegetation along the banks, tarpon were crashing and top and tailing across the glass-like surface and stretched for at least a couple of hundred yards in all four direction around the boat.
Until Marks shrimp on the wrong gear was grabbed, could we get a run? Could we hell. Although that is not strictly true because one of the live mullet had been nobbled by a 40lb hard-head catfish. Which is why we stuck with live baits on all the 50lb class outfits and this returns me to Marks back-breaking fight with a monstrous tarpon hooked on inadequate tackle and that tiny shrimp hook.
There was no time to lose as Mark’s fish was steadily getting further away from our anchored boat. Fortunately the tide was almost slack now and I buoyed the anchor enabling us to drift with the tarpon for however long it was going to take. Yet still all around the boat were huge tarpon showing their immensely thick flanks covered in scales the size of a beer mat, sometimes mere yards away. Following a spirited battle, Mark’s fish was – after three quarters of an hour – going slowly round and round the boat with Mark in tow. It really looked as though the impossible was actually going to happen and that Mark would be rewarded for skillfully and patiently playing such a monstrous fish on light gear.
The water was by now completely slack and we were both thinking about all sort of line class world records as the tarpon seemed to be getting larger, the closer it came to the boat. Then the inevitable happened with the sudden sound of the line parting like a pistol shot. The 20lb mono was so heavily frayed and distorted for several feet it was amazing the fight lasted as long as it did. That was the last occasion we saw those tarpon that week.
Loads of choice
While it’s true to say that until more research about the tarpon’s whereabouts, it is very much a hit and miss affair.
There is such a choice of fishing in The Gambia. I did enjoy some marvelous reef fishing at anchor for barracuda and cubera Snapper. I lost what Mark thought was a real hefty threadfin salmon (Kujeli’s local name) while trolling a Rapala CD18 Magnum plug through the mangrove creeks. But there is never enough time is there?
I could have trolled or fished cut bait at anchor around the edges of the many sandbars for the tarpon’s slimmer, much smaller cousin, the ladyfish which is called nine bones locally.
Then again a day sat in a dinghy at anchor in the creeks would have provided continual action in the way of red snappers, cassava, ray, barracuda and small jack. Alternatively, I could packed my 12ft beachcaster and gone south of Cape Point to explore a wonderful series of rocky coves and wide sandy beaches where on top of the tide numerous species of shark, plus stingray and huge guitar fish provide unbelievable action on a standard beachcaster, multiplier and 25lb line combo. Mark has recently started beach-fishing safaris using a pair of four-wheel drive custom built Mercedes trucks, transporting guests along the Gambia’s southern coastline to many unspoiled locations.
All the fishing gear is supplied. I’m going to try that one on my next visit!